Interest Payments For On-Time Tax Filers

Aug 19, 2020

Nearly 14 million Americans will receive an interest payment check from the IRS sometime this week. Here’s what you need to know:

What happened?
Due to the recent pandemic, this year’s tax filing deadline was pushed back to July 15 which is considered “disaster-related postponement.” As a result, the IRS, by law, must pay interest calculated from the original April 15 filing deadline to anyone who filed their individual return by the postponed deadline. Please note, businesses do not qualify for an interest payment.

What does this mean for me?
If you met the July 15 tax deadline and either received a refund in the past three months or anticipate receiving a refund, you will be receiving an interest payment! Funds will be directly deposited into the same bank account your tax refund was deposited otherwise you will be receiving a check in the mail. The amount of Interest is paid at rates set by law with the average payment being $18.

What is the taxability of these payments?
You must report the interest as taxable income on your 2020 federal income tax return you will file next year. In January 2021, the IRS will send a Form 1099-INT to anyone who receives interest totaling at least $10.

Next steps?
If you have questions regarding your interest payment check, please contact your William Vaughan Company advisor or contact us at 419.891.1040. We’d be happy to help!

Categories: COVID-19, Tax Planning


Accounting for PPP Loan Proceeds

Jul 20, 2020

Many businesses have received Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans and are now asking the question, “How do I account for the proceeds and potential forgiveness related to the PPP loan?”

The legal form of a PPP loan is debt, and regardless of the expectation of forgiveness, following the guidance under ASC 470, Debt will always be an appropriate option. However, the PPP loan does include a forgiveness component, resulting in many businesses wondering if the funds could be recorded as a grant. Currently, U.S. GAAP does not contain specific guidance on how business entities should account for government assistance. The AICPA has suggested that businesses can reference other guidance such as International Accounting Standard (IAS) 20 as an accounting framework for forgivable loans. A not-for-profit entity that received a government grant should apply ASC 958-605.

How does accounting work under both scenarios?

Debt
Balance Sheet
In accordance with ASC 470 Debt, upon receipt of the funds, a liability should be recognized for the full amount and will generally be classified as a long-term liability. Interest should be accrued at 1% beginning on the date the loan was received and continue over the term of the loan.

Income Statement
Any amount that is forgiven and the entity is legally released from its obligation, would be recognized as a gain in the income statement as an extinguishment of debt. This includes any interest which is forgiven.

Cash Flow
Receipt of the loan proceeds and any repayment, the Company would present as financing activities. Any funds that are ultimately forgiven would be disclosed as a noncash finance activity. Interest paid should be presented as a cash outflow from operating activities.

Disclosures
The disclosures in the financial statements, at a minimum, should indicate the accounting treatment, terms of the agreement, and where the loan amounts are recorded in the financial statements, similar to other debt.

Grant
For those entities that are reasonably assured that they will comply with the eligibility and forgiveness criteria for the full loan, grant accounting could be an appropriate option. These entities should consider the guidance under IAS 20.

Balance Sheet
Upon receipt of the forgivable loan, a short-term liability for deferred income should be recognized. As the entity incurs the eligible expenses, the income should be recognized and the liability should be reduced.

Income Statement
In accordance with IAS 20, grant income can be presented as a credit in the income statement either as a reduction to the related expenses or it can be presented in other income.

Cash Flows
Grant proceeds received, that are expected to be forgiven, should be presented as operating activities in the cash flows statement.

Disclosures
The disclosures in the financial statements should indicate the accounting policies applied, such as funds received, amounts included in both deferred income and recognized in income during the period, how deferred amounts will be recognized, and any unfulfilled conditions. The disclosure should also reference where the loan amounts are recorded in the financial statements.

Conclusion
If an entity does not anticipate meeting the PPP eligibility and loan forgiveness criteria, the loan should be accounted for as debt. In certain scenarios, in which the entity is reasonably assured of meeting the loan eligibility and forgiveness criteria for the full loan, it may be appropriate to account for the proceeds as a government grant. Whatever option the entity decides to follow, the financial statement disclosures should be straight-forward and inclusive.

The SBA has indicated it intends to issue additional guidance to help address questions from borrowers and lenders. All entities that received a PPP loan should continue to monitor for any developments which could impact their accounting for the loan. Should you have questions about your specific situation, please contact your William Vaughan Company advisor or reach out to our contributor, Juli Seiwert in our firm’s audit department.

Juli Seiwert, CPA

419.891.1040

juli.seiwert@wvco.com

 

Categories: Audit & Accounting, COVID-19


HHS Provider Relief Fund Means A New Dental Distribution

Jul 20, 2020

On July 10, 2020, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced dental providers can apply for relief under the Provider Relief Fund. The deadline to apply has been extended to August 28, 2020.

Eligible dentists can receive a reimbursement of 2% of their annual reported patient revenue. Applications are made through the Enhanced Provider Relief Fund Payment Portal.

To be eligible to apply, a dental provider must meet all of the following requirements:

  • Must not have received payment from the initial $50 billion Medicare-focused general distribution.
  • Must not have received payment from the $15 billion Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program distribution.
  • Must have filed a federal income tax return for fiscal years 2017, 2018 or 2019 or be an entity exempt from the requirement to file a federal income tax return and have no beneficial owner that is required to file a federal income tax return (for example, a state-owned hospital or health care clinic).
  • Must have provided patient dental care after Jan. 31.
  • Must not have permanently ceased providing patient dental care directly or indirectly through included subsidiaries.
  • If the applicant is an individual, have gross receipts or sales from providing patient dental care reported on Form 1040, Schedule C, Line 1, excluding income reported on a W-2 as a statutory employee.

Dentists who previously rejected and/or returned payments from the Medicare general distribution or the Medicaid and CHIP distribution are not eligible to apply now.

For HHS terms and conditions; For HHS Dental Distribution FAQs 

Categories: COVID-19, Healthcare & Dentistry


PPP Application Deadline Extended to August 8

Jul 06, 2020

On Saturday, July 4, President Trump signed legislation extending the application deadline for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) enacted in the weeks following the economic shutdown as a result of COVID-19.

The original deadline to apply was Tuesday, June 30, but with more than $130 billion still available in the fund, both houses of Congress approved the extension unanimously earlier in the week. With the President’s signature Saturday, businesses will now have until August 8 to apply for the assistance.

The PPP provides loans to small businesses to be used for certain payroll and non-payroll costs they may otherwise have difficulty funding due to the coronavirus pandemic. Such loans may be forgiven in part or in whole.

You can apply for your PPP loan through any of the 1,800 participating SBA approved 7(a) lenders or through any participating federally insured depository institution, federally insured credit union, and Farm Credit System institution. For more information on the federally funded program, visit the SBA website or connect with your William Vaughan Company advisor for additional guidance and recommendations based on your specific situation.

Categories: COVID-19, Other Resources


Latest SBA Guidance & Other Updates

Jun 18, 2020

Interim SBA Ruling
On Tuesday, June 16 the SBA filed its 19th Interim Final Rule (IFR) focused on revisions made from Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act (Flexibility Act) signed into law on June 5th.

Notable provisions in the unpublished document include:

  • The newest guidance shows how to calculate owner compensation. For Borrowers using a 24-week Covered Period, this amount is capped at $20,833 (the 2.5-month equivalent of $100,000 per year) for each individual or the 2.5-month equivalent of their applicable compensation in 2019, whichever is lower. For Borrowers using an 8-week Covered Period, this amount is capped at $15,385 (the eight-week equivalent of $100,000 per year) for each individual or the eight-week equivalent of their applicable compensation in 2019, whichever is lower. While the guidance is somewhat unclear, this cap appears to apply to owners of all entity types, and at any level of ownership.
  • The payroll requirement was reduced from 75% to 60%.
  • Lastly, the loan forgiveness amounts for non-payroll expenses have also been extended to 24 weeks, making it much easier to meet loan forgiveness thresholds.

EZ Version Loan Application
In addition, the SBA also released two new applications: a revised full-loan application and the new EZ Forgiveness Application. The agency says the EZ version “requires fewer calculations and less documentation” and reduces the burden for smaller recipients, like self-employed individuals and sole proprietors. This new EZ application applies to borrowers that:

  • Are self-employed and have no employees; OR
  • Did not reduce the salaries or wages of their employees by more than 25%, and did not reduce the number or hours of their employees; OR
  • Experienced reductions in business activity as a result of health directives related to COVID-19, and did not reduce the salaries or wages of their employees by more than 25%”.

Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) Re-opened
The SBA recently re-opened the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) and EIDL Advance program portal to all eligible applicants experiencing economic impacts due to COVID-19. Businesses with 500 or fewer employees are generally eligible. The loan process is streamlined and is completed online directly through the SBA. Loan amounts are determined by the SBA and can be up to $2 million with repayment terms up to 30 years and an interest rate of 3.75% (2.75% for non-profits). Additionally, you can request an advance on the loan, which will be awarded as $1,000 per employee, up to a total of $10,000.

As always, should you have questions or concerns about your specific situation, please contact your William Vaughan Company advisor. Additional resources can be found on our WVC COVID-19 Resource Center. Finally, stay tuned for an updated version of our WVC PPP Loan Forgiveness calculator which will reflect this updated guidance.

Categories: COVID-19, Other Resources